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While other recent polls have the U.S. Senate race in North Carolina at a virtual tie, Thursday morning brought dueling polls, one showing Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC) with a slight lead and another showing her Republican challenger state House Speaker Thom Tillis also with a slight lead. 

A Elon University Poll taken Oct. 21-25 and released Thursday has Hagan with a 4 percent leaded and a poll from the Republican group Vox Populi taken Oct. 25-27 also released Thursday has Tillis with a 5 percentage point lead.

In the Elon poll, Hagan boasts support from 44.7 percent of likely voters compared to Tillis’s 40.7 percent. The Libertarian third party candidate Sean Haugh was not listed by in in the poll, however 6.3 percent said they would be supporting somebody else besides the two major party candidates and 6.6 percent did not know. 

The results, taken from a sample of 687 likely voters has a margin of error of +/- 3.74 percentage points and, according to Elon, the new results “mirror” the findings from early last month.

The Vox Populi poll, which was first reported by Politico, has Tillis with 48 percent and Hagan with 43 percent. The Vox Populi poll also did not name Haugh in the survey but 4.9 percent said they were “unsure” who they would vote for between the two major candidates.  

The Vox Populi survey looked at 615 “active voters” and has a margin of error of +/-3.95 percentage points. 

The Elon and Vox Populi polls are slight outliers compared to the NBC News/Marist Poll and High Point University/SurveyUSA poll released earlier this week both of which found the race tied at 43 percent and 44 percent respectively. 

Meanwhile Wednesday The Rothenberg Political Report shifted the North Carolina Senate race from a “tossup/tilts Democratic” to “pure tossup.”




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tom_steyer1

A divide has begun to unfold in the usually conservative Tea Party movement in Florida and more generally in the Southeast. Debbie Dooley, the founder of the so-called Green Tea Party, has launched an effort in Florida to push for so-called energy deregulation, but it appears to be yet another avenue for wealthy liberals to advance a radical environmentalist agenda.

Dooley’s group Conservatives for Energy Freedom, and just a few weeks ago launched a chapter here in Florida. Their main purpose is to expand solar energy use. Sounds innocent enough until you dig deeper. It appears that there are direct links between Dooley and her group and ultra-liberal billionaire Tom Steyer’s group Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. This is Halloween scary.

The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy promotes a radical agenda of ending all use of fossil fuels at all costs, and they want to use state legislatures, state agencies, and the dreaded rule-making of the EPA to do it. Their policy notions are based on scattershot climatology reports, and they want to regulate and price the oil and gas industry out of existence.

Regardless of your views on the need for more renewable energy, accomplishing their goals will wreck the nation’s economy, put our national security at risk, and bankrupt the seniors and small businesses of this state.

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Kaci Hickox, Self-Absorbed Hero

by Joyce Lambert on October 30, 2014

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2014-10-29T202357Z_1_LYNXMPEA9S0XZ_RTROPTP_3_HEALTH-EBOLA-USA

You can not be a hero and self absorbed at the same time.

Granted, her first days back in the U.S. were in a makeshift tent none of us would have enjoyed. Returning Ebola-fighters deserve better than to poop in a box.

But America deserves better than the haughty scolding she has issued since leaving New Jersey for Maine. From her home state, she now informs us she has no intention of obeying limits placed on her for reasons of public safety. She will not be “bullied by politicians,” she says, weaving details of how her reaction to inconvenience has grown from shock to anger.

If Ms. Hickox wishes to see what anger looks like, she should visit Twitter. The country isn’t enjoying her griping. She showed selfless devotion to her fellow man in going to Sierra Leone. That attribute did not make it back through customs.

Instead, we get lawsuit threats and the same kind of snotty condescension that has us loving the CDC so much right now.
On a tour of network news shows Wednesday morning, Ms. Hickox demanded that an undereducated America worship at the altar of the “science” that she invokes to argue for her immediate release from the constraints of public safety. She brandishes her absence of symptoms in an attempt to escape a 21-day time-out that would provide substantial reassurance to a public rocked not just by Ebola but by the rank ineptitude of government in responding to it.

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obama keystone

Kerry blowing political smoke.

According to Reuters, “U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Tuesday during a visit to Canada that he would like to make a decision soon on TransCanada Corp’s Keystone XL crude oil pipeline. . . . While Kerry said he would like a quick decision on the project, he gave no hint as to when that would come. ‘I certainly want to do it sooner rather than later but I can’t tell you the precise date,’ Kerry told a joint news conference with Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird.”

This is an amazing statement from the Secretary of State given what Reuters writes in the second paragraph: “TransCanada has waited more than six years for the Obama administration to make a decision on the line, which would take as much as 830,000 barrels per day of Alberta tar sands crude to refineries on Texas’ Gulf Coast.”

The Obama administration has stalled and delayed the Keystone XL pipeline for more than six years now. Every time the president was faced with having to make a choice on approving or rejecting the pipeline’s permit, he’s avoided making a decision by giving excuses, asking for ever more studies, or trying to push a decision until after an election.

This pipeline should have been an easy choice years ago. “Support for [the] Keystone XL pipeline is almost universal,” as The Washington Post wrote in a headline over the summer. Unions have long urged its approval as a job creating project. The administration’s delays continue to harm our relations with our key allies in Canada and have been blasted by newspapers as “embarrassing” and union leaders as a “gutless move.”

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FBI wants expanded hacking authority

by Rhonda Bauer on October 30, 2014

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The FBI is pressing the little-known Advisory Committee on Criminal Rules to give it expanded authority to remotely hack and spy on computers in the U.S. and abroad.
Check it out:

Civil liberties and privacy advocates are calling the proposal a “new, expansive power” that could allow the government to collect private data, raising “significant” First and Fourth Amendment concerns. The FBI is arguing the change is a necessary update to outdated rules on territorial limits of warrants for electronic storage searches.

The proposal will come before the oversight committee next Wednesday. A lineup of technology experts and privacy advocates are scheduled to air their grievances.

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The Hill: Post Election ‘Civil War’ for GOP

by Breitbart Feed on October 30, 2014

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This article was originally posted in The Hill.

Conservatives salivating over the prospects of a huge victory on Nov. 4 are pressuring House and Senate GOP leaders to go big after Election Day.

The right argues leaders should forget about playing small ball, and use momentum from the midterms to put big checks on President Obama’s agenda.

“People want to see a bold vision. They want to see a real fight on ObamaCare repeal and tax reform that takes a blow torch to the tax code. They want to see real entitlement reform, not empty talk,” one conservative GOP aide said.

“The American people don’t want Republicans to become appeasers and supporters of a watered down Obama agenda.”

Read the rest of the article here.




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The trial of an imam who was accused of conducting hundreds of sham marriages for British residency permits has collapsed after a Home Office blunder meant the prosecution had no evidence to present at trial.

Mohammed Mattar, 62, was accused of performing the ceremonies at an ‘Islamic Centre’, in fact a bookshop, in North-West London between 2008 and 2012. It is thought there were some 580 of these ‘sham marriages’ in all, for which Mattar was arrested at the Dar Al Dawa bookshop of Westbourne Grove road in 2012, reports the Daily Telegraph.

The court case against Mr. Mattar for conspiring to facilitate a breach of UK immigration law and money laundering was due to proceed this month but was dropped at the last moment. A spokesman for the Criminal Prosecution Service, which is the government body which brings cases against individuals said: “In early 2014 we identified a large amount of potentially relevant material and we advised the Home Office investigation team to obtain and look into the material for the purpose of disclosure.

“In August it became apparent that this work had not been completed and therefore we would not be able to fully discharge disclosure obligations in the case before the trial.

“We therefore applied for an adjournment. This was refused by the court and we had no option, but to offer no evidence”.

Mr. Mattar’s wife maintained her husband’s innocence, and her ignorance of goings on in his daily life. She said: “We had a bookshop, that was it. He is a religious man, we are Muslim, but he never carried out any marriages… Police came to our house two years ago … They took some things away, I don’t know what it was, they said it was to do with sham marriages but Mohammed never talked about it.

“I am just a housewife… We don’t speak about these things”. When asked if her husband was an Imam or not, she said “Not that I know of, I’m too busy looking after my child. He’s a trader and he’s always out working”.

Mattar’s former bookshop in Westbourne Grove is just streets away from the Westbourne Park Al-Manaar mosque, the infamous Kensington place of worship linked to many British young jihadis now dead or fighting abroad. As reported by Breitbart London, the chairman of the mosque admitted earlier this month that his congregation was so large on Fridays he was unable to prevent radicalisation. He said: “On Fridays we have about 2,000 people come. Who meets who? Who says what to who? I think it would be dishonest if I told you ‘No’.

“But we try our best to control what goes on in our premises. We don’t allow people to address the congregation; we don’t allow people to distribute literature. Unfortunately these things happen on the big occasions, like on Fridays. And then you find people on the street outside the mosque, lobbying people, giving out literature — some of it for good causes, some of it for others”.

‘Jihadi rapper’ and ISIS fighter Abdel-Majed Abdel Bary, who was considered to be a potential man behind ‘Jihadi John’ has been linked with the mosque, as well as local boys and Al-Manaar worshippers, Hamza Parvez and Mohammed Nasser.

Nasser was killed in an explosion shortly after arriving in Syria in May, but Parvez is still fighting and “is actively taking part” in the establishment of the Islamic State. Other former worshippers are known to have gone to fight abroad, and “underwear smuggler” Amal Al-Wahabi who tried to get large amounts of cash to her jihadi husband in Turkey in her friends knickers was a former employee of the mosque’s nursery.  




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Sen. Rand Paul is in demand.

Sen. Paul (R-KY) has been to 30 states in the last 12 months leading up to the midterm elections to help U.S. Senate, U.S. House, gubernatorial, and state and local Republican candidates nationwide. He has keynoted state GOP conventions in Texas, California, Idaho, and Maine and rallied students at colleges and universities, ranging from the conservative University of South Carolina to liberal Berkeley to the bellwether Universities of Iowa and New Hampshire—and many in between. He’s been leading inner city GOP efforts in Detroit, Chicago, and even the race-riot-rocked Ferguson, Missouri. Paul was the only national elected Republican who spoke at the National Urban League conference. Reince Priebus, the chairman of the RNC, also spoke there.

For someone who has not run for president—at least not yet—Paul’s probably been the GOP’s most visible and most sought after surrogate this year.

“We’ve been getting a lot of requests, and people reach out because they think we can get voters beyond the Republican Party, we can reach independents, and in the last final days of elections, elections go one way or another based on undecideds,” Paul said. “That’s where the real power is in politics—in those who can sway the uncommitted. I think a lot of the invitations we’ve gotten, frankly, are because they think we can have influence on the independent voters.”

Whatever it is about Paul that intrigues voters is working. He says it’s because he appeals to a wide swath of independent-minded voters he calls the “leave-me-alone coalition.”

Paul said:

I think there’s a coalition of people, I call them the “leave-me-alone coalition,” and these are people who kind of just want to be left alone. It could be young people who don’t want the government looking through their cell phone records, it could people of religious faith who don’t think the government should be monitoring our sermons or requesting sermons to review. It could be people who believe that economic opportunity in our big cities just hasn’t come with Democrat policies and high taxes. I’m in Detroit today talking about economic freedom zones. So I think there’s a whole host of issues—and I think ultimately Americans want a strong national defense, but they don’t want us to be involved in every civil war around the world. So I think a certain degree of reluctance to go to war, combined with a significant degree of resolve from the country is certainly something that appeals to a lot of people beyond our party.

Republican candidates are practically begging him for help. There’s hardly a day that goes by nowadays where he’s not on the campaign trail backing up GOP Senate candidates or stepping onto the front lines of hard-fought governor’s races. On Wednesday, he was in Detroit, Michigan, a trip on which he was backing incumbent Republican Gov. Rick Snyder’s tough but expected-to-be-successful re-election battle and backed GOP Senate candidate Terri Lynn Land. The day before, he was in Kansas helping incumbent Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS) against liberal “independent” Greg Orman. While he was there, he backed Sam Brownback’s re-election as governor and helped House candidates Reps. Mike Pompeo and Tim Huelskamp.

Paul had just rolled an out an ad for Roberts on Greta Van Susteren’s Fox News program earlier in the week, right after he got back from a trip to Georgia to campaign alongside GOP U.S. Senate nominee David Perdue. He’s been to New Hampshire to endorse GOP U.S. Senate nominee Scott Brown and campaigned for gubernatorial candidate Walt Havenstein—after delivering the keynote address at the state party’s post-primary unity breakfast.

After endorsing Thom Tillis’ primary challenger, Greg Brannon, earlier in the year, a couple weeks ago, Paul ventured into Raleigh, North Carolina, to back Tillis—the GOP nominee—against incumbent Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC). Later that night, he campaigned for Rep. Walter Jones (R-NC) at a barbecue event where hundreds of Jones—and Rand—supporters attended.

Paul rallied with Dave Brat and Ed Gillespie in Virginia, and he has campaigned for Joni Ernst in Iowa a few times. Although he has not made that lengthy trek up to Alaska, Paul is being blasted around the Last Frontier’s airwaves in a U.S. Chamber of Commerce ad for Republican Dan Sullivan. Paul’s been to Arkansas for Tom Cotton and in Nebraska for Ben Sasse, and is featured in forthcoming robo-calls for Ohio Gov. John Kasich. John Dennis, the GOP candidate challenging Nancy Pelosi for her House seat, was lucky to have Paul’s support, even though he has virtually no chance of winning. Paul visited Idaho not just for the state GOP convention there, but also to campaign for Rep. Raul Labrador’s re-election. He’s campaigned for South Carolina Reps. Mick Mulvaney and Jeff Duncan, and for Iowa’s Steve King, Rod Blum, and Mariannette Miller-Meeks. While in Maine, Paul endorsed Gov. Paul LePage’s re-election. In the D.C. area, he’s also been to several events with Maryland congressional candidate Dan Bongino.

To top it off, Paul ensured his home state colleague and Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell’s likely victory by backing him in the primary and then in the general election, helping McConnell against Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes.

In the middle of it all, Paul went on a medical mission to Guatemala to perform pro bono eye surgeries— a trip on which Breitbart News accompanied him—and he witnessed firsthand the other side of the border crisis.

And that’s not the totality of Paul’s involvement. 

“Senator Paul has done a great deal to advance the cause of liberty this election cycle,” FreedomWorks President and CEO Matt Kibbe told Breitbart News. “His energy, principled approach, and outreach to non-traditional voters have made him a popular surrogate in almost every race across the country. We need more guys like him in Washington that are ready to shake things up.”

Eliana Johnson, the National Review’s D.C. editor and one of the first to notice Paul’s nationwide efforts on behalf of the GOP, noted in a late September piece that Paul’s “ubiquity contrasts with that of some of his colleagues,” like Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL). Rubio, who took a massive hit in popularity after pushing through the Senate “Gang of Eight” immigration bill, has focused his efforts on some key Senate races like those in Iowa, Arkansas, Colorado, and New Hampshire. A Rubio aide told Johnson at the time that Rubio wanted to “make a big impact by focusing on a handful of races.”

But Paul’s focus is bigger. Not only is he aiming to win key races, but he is attempting to organize the Republican Party around his message. As Paul strengthens the party, he is also building his own brand ahead of a likely White House run in 2016—and increasing his presence in key presidential states. But he is also showing a stark contrast between himself and President Obama, the current leader of the Democratic Party. He also frequently draws contrasts between himself and Hillary Clinton, the likely 2016 Democratic nominee, almost as if he’s looking past the 2016 GOP primary to begin fighting the general election.

“I think Democrats see Sen. Paul as a serious threat,” Matt Moore, the South Carolina GOP chairman, told Breitbart News recently. “He’s talking about issues that no one else is willing to talk about. I like that he’s trying to connect with every American, not just Republicans or Democrats. It’s refreshing and unique.”

“Senator Rand Paul is a strong advocate for the Republican principles of limited government, fiscal responsibility, and individual liberty,” New Hampshire GOP Chairwoman Jennifer Horn added. “He was extremely well received by our grassroots activists at our Republican Unity breakfast, and we look forward to welcoming him back to the Granite State again soon.”

On the campaign trail this year, most Democrats, save a few, have outright distanced themselves from the President and avoided his help. Paul said the President’s failures are something he’s noticed nationwide, and they will help the Republicans take back the Senate, embolden their House majority, and win key elections in state governments across the country.

“I think the wind is at our back,” Paul said. “Everything the President has touched in recent months has turned to stone. The economy is not that great. There’s less people working than were working six years ago. The President’s overreach with regard to immigration, his under reach with regard to Ebola—all the different things he’s tried to do without coming to Congress, war powers, et cetera—I think most of the public is just alarmed at kind of a directionless President.”

Paul added that Alison Lundergan Grimes—whom he calls “Mrs. Grimes”—is likely to lose in Kentucky because she would not tell voters whom she voted for in the last presidential election.

“That’s what’s done in Mrs. Grimes in Kentucky—if she can’t even admit who she voted for, the leader of her party, that she supported him, how is she to be trusted on other issues?” Paul asked, adding:

It’s the same way out in Kansas. I was out in Kansas yesterday, and they’ve got an “independent.” It’s one thing to be independent, but if you don’t tell the voters who you’re going to side with, it’s like you’ve really been in politics to this degree and you don’t know which side better represents your ideas? There’s a great big difference in the Senate between the Republicans and the Democrats. Democrats want to raise taxes, Republicans want to lower them. Democrats want to increase regulations, Republicans are the opposite. So for Greg Orman out in Kansas to say he hasn’t decided makes people just wonder whether he’s being honest with them.

Democrats are “collapsing,” Paul said, because of a failing President, whose policies not only do not work, but are backfiring on Americans.

“Running away from the President, not willing to be forthright, all of those things are just—I think the Democrats’ campaigns are just collapsing before our very eyes,” Paul said. “The race in Colorado is sort of almost comical that Democrats are saying Republicans are against condoms. So I see a collapse of the Democrat platform right now.”

When asked what the grassroots conservatives can do to help bring Republicans across the finish line in the key battles nationwide, Paul said they should get involved in phone banks and door-to-door efforts with grassroots groups, their candidates’ campaigns, and local GOP outfits.

Paul stated:

Enthusiasm comes out in the very end, whether or not you’ve got people showing up to phone banks and making that extra mile on the phones and whether or not you’ve got people going door to door. Whether or not you’ve got people doing that, you can tell whether turnout is generated. 

“I think the wind is at our backs,” Sen. Paul asserted, “and there’s an enthusiasm gap on the other side, and I really think there’s a great deal of dissatisfaction with the President. I really truly think this will be a referendum on the President.”




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Screen-Shot-2014-10-29-at-9.44.48-PM-550x432

Someone in the TSA must have been a Flash Gordon fan….
Check it out:

I am livid. Angry. Filled with rage.

A few minutes ago (as of this posting, a few hours), I lost my favorite belt buckle to the TSA at Los Angeles International Airport, because – they claimed – it was a “replica” of a gun.

What kind of a gun, you might ask?

A 1950s Flash Gordon-style RAYGUN!! A fictional weapon. A child’s toy.

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169aba51f4c1aff83b6bd7590264e0ea

A new nationwide poll shows that President Barack Obama’s Svengali-like hold over America’s youth voting cohort may have finally loosened.
Check it out:

The poll, by Harvard’s Institute of Politics, reveals that 18-to-29-year-old Americans are abandoning the Democratic coalition built largely by Obama, National Journal reports.

Millennials who participated in the poll and said they will “definitely be voting” in next week’s elections prefer Republican congressional candidates over their Democratic opponents by a margin of 51 percent to 47 percent.

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